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20131028
20131105
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Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)
of that power becomes science. if you fall you hurt yourself and you die. the waves are so powerful that the surfers have to be towed by jet skis to catch it to ride one. she fell and was pulled out of the sea unconscious by burle. she survived and he went back in the water. he said it was karma. at the end i asked to catch a wave when everyone else was leaving and picked up one. i think that was the reward. the record is held by garrett mcnamara. earlier he told us how he managed to break the fear barrier. >> everybody has their comfort zones. i won't jump out of a plane, i like riding big waves. >> reporter: mcnamara is waiting for confirmation he broke his own record by riding a 100-foot plus wave in january. challenging the pickbiggest waves in the world isn't a competitive sport. they win when they end the day together on the beach waiting for the next big one. for "cbs this morning," allen pizzey rome. >> there's something i wouldn't want to do. >> finally. >> norah, you're the daredevil, too. would you do that? >> absolutely. >> would you surf on it? >> no
. thanks, mom. >>> whatever happened to americans' love of science? technology writer david pogue is in our toyota green room. he looks at how we can create more ah-ha moments. hi, david. that's ahead on "cbs this morning." >>> this portion of "cbs this morning" sponsored by international delight coffee creamer. delight in the season. discover card. i asked my husband to pay our bill, and he forgot. you have the it card and it's your first time missing a payment, so there's no late fee. really? yep! so is your husband off the hook? no. he went out for milk last week and came back with a puppy. hold it. hold it. hold it. at discover, we treat you like you'd treat you. get the it card with late payment forgiveness. [ male announcer ] playing in the nfl is tough. ♪ ♪ doing it with a cold just not going to happen. ♪ ♪ vicks dayquil powerful non-drowsy 6-symptom cold & flu relief. ♪ ♪ no matter what city you're playing tomorrow... [ coughs ] [ male announcer ] ...you can't let a cold keep you up tonight. ♪ ♪ vicks nyquil powerful nighttime 6-symptom
of the great social science mysteries of the past 20 years is why is crime down so much. here in new york it's most dramatic but all over the country it's been going down. the other thing is dna evidence in the exonerations because of dna and the tremendous work the innocence project and other lawyers have done to show how imperfect our legal system is. that translates directly into jurors saying, you know, we're just not sure enough to impose the death penalty as much as we have in the past. and you take those two things, just fewer murders to prosecute and more reluctant jurors and you have a really dramatic change in how the public -- in how death penalty is used. >> do you think that continues? >> it seems to me that it depends on the types of crime that you're talking about. if you're talking about a sandy hook or situation where there's mass murderer, children involved, terrorist inspired activity, my guess is that you'll continue to see pretty strong support. even not that our legal system should reflect public opinion but obviously people still a ma yoert of americans still do believ
. this is not rocket science. we are in an age in which we have testing that works for the medicare program, for the medicaid program, for welfare, for head start. there are lots of government programs, large-scale government programs in which we protect private information. there's no reason why this program doesn't have that kind of protection, and it will have that kind of protection from the assurance of the secretary and from the president. >> thank you so much, donna. thanks for being with us from miami today. >>> and in our first look at a new nbc news wall street journal poll, the full poll will be unveiled tonight, we're seeing just how the botched rollout of healthcare.gov is perceived across the nation. it's a mix of opinions. nearly equal amongst americans believing that there are short-term issues that can be corrected, long-term issues that cannot be fixed, and those who say it's just too soon to make a judgment call. joining me now for our daily fix is chris cillizza. chris, you watch eed hearing. you've taken a look at this poll. we know there's more to come in the poll toni
considered computer science growing up. >> my main problem was the stigma around it. oh, you do computer science. you must be anti-social and not talk to anybody. i don't know if it hurts young girls more than boys but it definitely affected me a lot. >> i thought it was really cool to be able to make a program and to be able to customize it. it involves a lot of creativity and it's very clap rahhive, which is what people don't think. >> welcome to the 2013 celebration for women in computer. >> that's what attracted them and more than 4,000 other women to the grace harper conference in minneapolis. >> we need women to lead along with men. >> here industry leaders like facebook's chief operating operator sheryl sandberg talked tech and featured the future. jobs that can pay upwards of 40% more than the average career salary. >> when you look out here and see all of these women, diverse crowd of women -- >> i love it. >> reporter: maria is the president of harvey mudn college. they've quadrupled their female students. >> you have to have women believe they ca
has the tech wor world. >> it's exactly why these students never considered computer science growing up. >> my main problem was the stigma around it. oh, you do computer science. you must be anti-social and not talk to anybody. i don't know if it hurts young girls more than boys but it definitely affected me a lot. >> i thought it was really cool to be able to make a program and to be able to customize it. it involves a lot of creativity and it's very clap rahhive, which is what people don't think. >> welcome to the 2013 celebration for women in computer. >> that's what attracted them and more than 4,000 other women to the grace harper conference in minneapolis. >> we need women to lead along with men. >> here industry leaders like facebook's chief operating operator sheryl sandberg talked tech and featured the future. jobs that can pay upwards of 40% more than the average career salary. >> when you look out here and see all of these women, diverse crowd of women -- >> i love it. >> reporter: maria is the president of harvey mudn college. they've quadrupled their female students. >>
have indoor plumbing than google, though imy want twitter more than plumbing. science is hard. >> science is hard. >> here to explain the process is nicole allen, senior editor of "the atlantic" which highlighted the inventions and inventors that shape our world. >> thanks for having me. >> what surprised you most? which are the 50 surprised you most? >> i have to say that i was probably most surprised by alphabetizati alphabetization, one of our panelists, joel, an economist at northwestern pushed it hard. his argument that without alphabetization, we would have no way of ordering knowledge and searching the information that's available. so imagine you know, try to have an index in a book without it or trying to order a library. he argued it led to the rise of societies that had phonetic letters over ones with -- >> did you find there were certain time periods or even societies that were particularly fertile breeding grounds for inno vacation and did they share characteristics? >> absolutely. the first one that comes to mind is the industrial age. so many of our innovations w
. this is the golden age of sigh ent science. people forget that 50% of economic growth can be traced to advancements in the bio science. >> will obama care help or hinder that development. does it get in the way or does it mean more access will drive better outcomes? >> i think the issue you are talking about obama care is focused on care and treatment. the largest part. if we are going to solve the problem, it really isn't care and treatment. the issue is really prevention, wellness, research cure. >> there are more and more people talking about this on wall street. the lines between a company like apple and some of the names that you are talking about in this conference are blurring, because, frankly, wearable technology and personalized medicine sounds like the next big wave. what's going to be the next facebook or twitter for this space? >> i don't know that i can make that prediction but there is a very rapid evolution naary proc going on here. what we need is a healthy ecosystem, that involves phrma and biotech and special device companies and computational companies that are dealing with big
to distance themselves from the science of killing each other. as ohio seeks alternatives they could set up for legal and moral roadblocks. joining me, co-host of the cycle. states like ohio turn to other types of drugs called compounding pharmacies not regulated by fda. we have missouri one of the latest to cancel execution planned on using propofol but found there would be legal problems. explain questions around the country. >> one of the big problems is there are rules against using humans as test subjects. even though they have been set up for capital punishment in the legal process doesn't mean we can treat them for guinea pigs for punishment, execution that's never been tried before with drugs. you can sue for cruel and unusual punishment. have you a claim if this is a drug cocktail that's never been used to execute anyone. >> we have 32 states that use lethal injection as primary form of capital punishment. so are there any states ruling out using the drugs now and going back to older forms and other options for going through with the death penalty. >> basically several states like
've done. you've sort of taken the experience of it and maybe the science of it and cut around the media and gone directly to the public with it. why was that important to you? what do you want people to get out of that? >> for me, the ultimate reality tv was the first moon landing. if you think about it, a billion people worldwide were invited in to watch something unscripted, live, see how it goes, whatever they say, whatever happens, happens. and it was hugely effective for the same reasons that social media is effective today. if you show people honestly what's happening, if you invite them in, you don't force them to watch, you don't yell at them, just say, come see what's happening. that's what we did on board our time on space station. you can come look if you like. as a result, millions of people got to see what it's really like living in space, not just the science and the experiments, but just people up there living, doing things, brushing our fooefooet teeth, making music. >> you gave a quote to "usa today" about what it was like to do a space walk. you said, in one hand, you'
, whenever it is. stem, stem for instance. science, technology, engineer g engineering. why not talk about skill in the context of every squob that requires it. if you do that, you'll appeal to a lot of kids' brains who will otherwise tune you out because that's how they see the world. it's a question of i'm against college and for this. it's like look, you have to have a big conversation, and if you're still hanging posters up that say work smart, not hard. it's a reflection of what we value. that's it. >> could not agree more. mike rowe great to see you. mike rowe works foundation is your non-profit scholarship to students pursuing a career in the skills trade. >> i'll take it. >> thank you. >> sorry about the twitter. >> fist pumping for the one and only arsin yil hall. he is in the house.mike rowe. he is in the housa. he is in the housa. he is in the house. we still run into problems. that's why liberty mutual insurance offers accident forgiveness if you qualify, and new car replacement, standard with our auto policies. so call liberty mutual at... today. and if you switch, you could s
is that this is not rocket science. there are companies such as health insurance that have been selling insurance over the internet for ten years successfully, but the government cannot seem to do it. gerri: here are some war room nos from the day after the launch. ongoing problems in my capacity and the website, director roman not working, viejo system not connecting, experience, one of the ig groups, creating confusion with credit check information. on and on the goes. six enrollments have occurred. the problem seems enormous degrees today at the white house did it white house spokesman could not even explained if that enrollment figure was correct. they're grappling with the "truth unsuccessfully. >> the number probably is not correct. but so what if it is in our 15? it is still a complete failure. the fact is that they have a problem and they don't want to admit it. this is just a front end of the problem. this is the problem that the consumers are facing. what about the insurance companies that are getting that information? it is terrible. gerri: allow the bottleneck, is not to get on to the syst
. the first is complexity as science and technology and economics radically up end the world judges can be out of their depth. the second is a system failure, to use politics when interpreting the law. he criticizes scalia for elevating dictionaries over realism and common sense which hammered decisions from gun rights to allowing too much money in our politics and he his in his new book that it can be a cover for a political agenda. joining us today, richard posner, judge, author, thinker, thanks for being here. >> my pleasure. >> let me start with a point you make in the book. you refer to a sign say outside of the restaurant, no animals allowed. pretty simple. and you say that we would have to interpret that not literally, you write there's a danger in appealing to generalities to decide cases a human being is an animal. a sign forbidding animals in a restaurant sure not be interpreted to ban humans and judges shouldn't apply a law based on the meaning of words compose it and they have to have a sense of what the rule is concerned with. why is that important in the court? >> why is it impor
need without any surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. . >> thanks for staying with us, i'm bill o'reilly in the is it legal segment tonight. three hot topics, aging asian americans store stop halloween costume sale. with us is kimberly guilfoyle and lis wiehl. tell me why these costumes. put them up on the screen. >> put them up. >> tell me why they are offensive. >> the can i money know is kimono. >> that's the guy in a traditional asian kimoo. >> this is a sushi chef. >> i like that. >> elegant. look, if you. >> so that's offensive? >> apparently to this organization it's offensive. but, absolutely. look. >> i don't want any apparentlies. offensive or not? >> no. >> i have the kimono at home. it's nice. >> why didn't you wear it? >> i should have. >> so two nos. let's put the sushi guy up again. i don't need sushi because japanese means bacteria. i could be wrong about that i thought that this guy was the soccer player in japan. oh, no, no, no. so he is a sushi chef, what's offensive about a sushi chef? >> the organization says they d
. we have done some amazing things and have it down to a science. >> all of their families in the lobster business in a lobster fresh, direct every single day. the freshest products. without that i am not so sure there would have gotten. >> what mistakes do you see? start with the product you know. what tips would you give the people? >> start with the product you honest to god love through and through. that passion is so obvious. the mistake they made is after six months in the business they could have a giant franchise business. when i saw a million-plus in sales, i could see that going everywhere. a lot of people making a lot of profit. usually telling people to slow down, but these guys, go faster. melissa: would you be interested if it was a restaurant? >> no. the restaurant, that's what location. if they'd all like that location, they roll around and find the best location. you can move the charge to where the traffic is. he picked the wrong location, you are there for ten years and out of business. melissa: have you find the right people to be in the truck? agass
headlines. >> i learned something new about maria molina. did you know she used to be a science teacher? >> no. >> 7th grade science teacher. >> really? >> anyway, that's your interesting tidbit for the day. got some headlines. did you hear about this? a new york university student who slipped between two buildings in downtown new york city, was missing for 36 hours and he has finally been found. he was lodged between the two buildings, a dorm and also a parking garage. the space was just two feet wide. it took an hour and a half for first responders to reach him. they had to break a wall just to get him out. >> had we not told the security guards, the three of us 19-year-old students to check the roof, they would not have found him for who knows how long and he would probably be dead right now. >> the student was reportedly on his dorm roof building, 17 stories high, and we're told that he was taking part in a fire drill when he slipped between the building. he's hospitalized in serious condition. >>> looks like a scene from the movie, but these incredible images show the aftermath of
control, they figured maybe just leaving it is the only other option. >> reporter: political science professor seth maskit says the movement is an example of republicans who are the minority in this state taking desperate measures. in colorado, democrats have control of the senate, house and governor's office. while supporters of the referendum know there's no practical implication from the vote, they say it's a sure way to get attention for their cause. but not everyone agrees with this strategy. >> the best strategy for dealing with political issues is through the political system. >> reporter: the d.a., ken buck, a high profile colorado republican, is among those frustrated. he plans to vote against the 51st state initiative. >> i think what we need to do is make sure that we work doubly hard to get the folks who aren't listening out of office and to make sure that our voices are heard. >> reporter: governor john hickenlooper welcomes more dialogue, saying quote, if this talk of a 51st state is about politics designed to divide us, it is destructive but if it is about sending a me
, lamborghini is still exploring the limits of the science of engineering and the art of irrational romance. >> go to 60minutesovertime.com to find out what it feels like to go more than 15o miles an hour in a lamborghini. sponsored by pfizer. [ male announcer ] it's simple physics... a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inflammation. plus, in clinical studies, celebrex is proven to improve daily physical function so moving is easier. celebrex can be taken with or without food. and it's not a narcotic. you and your doctor should balance the benefits with the risks. all prescription nsaids, like celebrex, ibuprofen, naproxen and meloxicam have the same cardiovascular warning. they all may increase the chance of heart attack or stroke, which can lead
be and should be examined and investigated by medical science. >> yes. no one disagrees with that. >> we've finally got an nih trial on this use for cannabinoids for children in terms of epilepsy and seizures. why did it take so long? because it's still illegal, charles. we don't know what benefit this drug has. lancet, britain's medical journal called it the aspirin of the 21st century. that's not limited. >> the reason that this hasn't been explored is because drug companies can't make money off it. do you buy that? >> cannibis is already entering into colorado -- >> the plant. >> tobacco is a plant. let's not forget that. tobacco is a plant. that was a serious problem. >> the big point you do want to get illegal element out of the trade. >> listen. here's the big problem you guys are missing it. people still have a moral model as it pertains to the human relationship to substances. it has nothing to do with morality. it's a by biological event. it makes them behave in immoral ways, some people who use the drugs, they want to make it a moral issue. >> we're going to talk about obesity
's a science, government is learning this. most ecommerce start-ups fail, few succeed. we have been fortunate like amazon and ebay. we have bought the the know-how, the science, we can immediately in these states enroll people in a significant way. >> how many customers have i accommodated? could you handle the scale of this? >> we saw 20 million americans come to us last year, interestingly, over half were between the ages of 18 and 34 years of age. >> that is the prime group need to get enrolled. all the focus is on the website not working. the focus soon is going to be on enrollment and having balance in these enrollment pools, otherwise, we will have real pricing issues. that to me is a fundamental issue and a bigger calgary. why not bring the best of the government sector to gather government and make it work. >> mike. >> the rollout has been a mess. let's stipulate that. let's also stipulate that the plan as it was assembled is kind of confusing to a lot of people now. it's only been a couple of weeks. >> true. >> nothing has ever evolved in a couple of weeks of this scope. but you tell
of the sudden they are out of business. >> it's not rooted in science. congress shouldn't be messing around with things it doesn't understand. >> congress likes to do that remember last week they pretended they understood how the internet worked. coming up on the show, just when you thought obama care couldn't get any worse it, does the ceo of one of the biggest investigation for fraud of the bombshell report you need to hear next. just in the nick of time meet the woman who claims the lottery ticket with just hours to spare. moments really. >> that could happen to you, oh, wait, no. [ fishing rod casting line, marching band playing ] [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. [ m'm... ] great taste. [ tapping ] sounds good. campbell's healthy request. m'm! m'm! good.® i get out a lot... except when it's too cold. like the last three weekends. asthma doesn't affect my job... you missed the meeting again last week! it doesn't affect mfamily. you
tools you need without any surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. but it doesn't usually work that way with health care. with unitedhealthcare, i get information on quality rated doctors, treatment options and cost estimates, so we can make better health decisions. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. maestro of project management. baron of the build-out. you need a permit... to be this awesome. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. (aaron) purrrfect. (vo) meee-ow, business pro. meee-ow. go national. go like a pro. >>> all right. let's talk some world series. mike barnacle, thrilled to be up with us at this hour in the central time zone from st. louis. along with senior writer for sports on earth.com and founding editor of sport website dead spin. gentlemen, good morning. >> good morning. >> wow, quick response. >> it was a quick response. >> look how happy they are. >> so, mike, unbelievable endi
's not just the vitamin business, but the health science business or and pets -- lori: bingo, pets. adam: where overseas? >> that's just it, i see a lot of stuff in canada, but nowhere else. that's not just canada, obviously, i don't know all the different locations, i've been drilling down for that. i'll get that next time. but 125 new stores internationally last quarter versus 100 stores in america. at 3200, we're getting a little saturated. lori: so i shouldn't chalk this up as a staple -- or i should, versus a discretionary. >> yeah, i know. i guess people who are on these regiments consider it something that, you know, it's not discretionary. i mean, people who are on these vitamin regiments really believe in the it, and we are in a health-conscious society. the vitamin shop is the only main competitor, but the margins are -- lori: and they're selling pet vitamins. >> pet supplements, can you believe it? lori: no. [laughter] thank you so much, charles. adam: so as we do every 15 minutes, back to the floor of the new york stock exchange, and nicole petallides will let us know what sh
of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. okay, who helps you focus on your recovery? yo, yo, yo. aflac. wow. [ under his breath ] that was horrible. pays you cash when you're sick or hurt? [ japanese accent ] aflac. love it. [ under his breath ] hate it. helps you focus on getting back to normal? [ as a southern belle ] aflac. [ as a cowboy ] aflac. [ sassily ] aflac. uh huh. [ under his breath ] i am so fired. you're on in 5, duck. [ male announcer ] when you're sick or hurt, aflac pays you cash. find out more at aflac.com. [ male announcer ] when you're sick or hurt, aflac pays you cash. explaining my moderate to severe so there i was again, chronic plaque psoriasis to another new stylist. it was a total embarrassment. and not the kind of attention i wanted. so i had a serious talk with my dermatologist about my treatment options. this time, she prescribed humira-adalimumab. humira helps to clear the surface of my skin by actually working inside my body. in clinical trials, most adults with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis saw 75
you can get all the online trading tools you need without any surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. was a truly amazing day.ey,. without angie's list, i don't know if we could have found all the services we needed for our riley. from contractors and doctors to dog sitters and landscapers. you can find it all on angie's list. join today. maestro of project management. baron of the build-out. you need a permit... to be this awesome. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. (aaron) purrrfect. (vo) meee-ow, business pro. meee-ow. go national. go like a pro. >> joining us now for faith on friday. president obama's spiritual adviser and the author of the president's devotional. a daily prayer, stories and scriptures he sent to the president to help inspire him. very good to have you on the show. what would be the prayer today? >> today was actually about fear and how to overcome fear and bounce back. i use the gre
science fi [ male announcer ] it is more than just a new car... more than a new interior lighting system. ♪ it is more than a hot stone massage. and more than your favorite scent infused into the cabin. it is a completely new era of innovation. and the highest expression of mercedes-benz. introducing the 2014 s-class. the best or nothing. >>> good morning. looking live from the bridge at emeryville this morning, pretty clear this morning but chilly. i'm kris sanchez along with meteorologist rob mayedda. >> things are going to change by mid afternoon, a cold front, not seeing showers but a cool front gushing into the area. the wind speeds should not get quite as strong. you'll notice hour by hour, wind speeds getting up around 45 miles an hour. starting at 11:00 tonight, mostly sunny, 60s and 0s for highs today. tomorrow, a little bit cooler and we're going to be getting that extra hour of sleep. >> i was singing the happiest time of the year song around this time. >> bart workers approved a temporary contract. union leaders announced a ratification about the outcome of the vote. the un
medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare >>> this week on the science behind, we take a look at chris hatfield's explorations in space. the former nasa astronaut has been on three missions, including one as the commander of the international space station, that lasted 144 days. that's where he earned the nickname, "the singing astronaut," for this performance from space. ♪ this is ground control to major tom ♪ ♪ you've really made the grade and the papers want to know ♪ ♪ whose shorts you wear >> that's fun. the video went viral, of course, getting more than 18 million views, and making hatfield a bit of a star among his astronauts. and everybody else, too. now he's written a book called an astronaut's guide to life on earth. commander chris hatfield joining me now from washington. good to see you, commander. >> nice to see you, fredricka, thanks. >> what is the lessons space taught you about how to better live life on earth? >> you know, we do one of the most dangerous things that anybody faces, and that is riding up an elevator, crawling in on your hands and knees, and riding a roc
a demonstration because one of my science teachers did this to illustrate what dry ice is and the process this goes through 'cause it goes through something called sublimation, which is when ice goes from a substance to a gas. here is dry ice. everybody know what is it looks like. for halloween, you can drop it into a cup of hot water and then it will create that fog. it's a little breezy. so it's actually going towards the side over here. this is something you can do on halloween. if you're safe in a well ventilated area and with gloves, of course. now let's look at the weather conditions across the country because we do have some extreme weather to tell you about, especially across parts of texas where we have flash flood warnings in effect and watches stretching up through sections of missouri. we've had eight inches of rain in some of these areas. again, very dangerous weather ongoing across that area. now we want to take a look at that storm system producing some areas of rain, from texas all the way up into the great lakes and later on this afternoon, we do have the risk for severe
weird science, make up the girl. >> let's be clear, she started and a blonde bombshell. i don't know she needed all the improvements. >> but it isamazing. you can't believe anything you see on print or tv. >> i think air brushing here and there, but that's crazy. >> well, a rant that's resonating with a lot of people is trending on huffington post. how did it get to be okay for people to be late to everything? now it's the most popular stories online right now. this is a pet peeve for a lot of us, matt, go. >> i just don't believe how people think 15 minutes is the new on time. >> when i first moved to new york, that was the norm here. you've got 15 minutes, we'll give you 15 minutes. >> it's wrong. >> you're on time, you're on time. my dad had what we called ais time -- blank in seat. >> he was a bus driver. you're supposed to be on time. >> the author greg savage said an arrangement to meet someone for coffee at 3:00 means 3:10 and you get a text that says i'm ten minutes way which means 20 minutes. this is a deal breaker when it comes to business and friendships. i try to be puntional
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)